How & Why We Celebrate Indigenous Peoples Day in Our Homeschool

Sharing resources we used to continuously learn about the first people that were on lands we call home. Please share the resources you use we are always looking to expand what know and think we know. The growing recognition and celebration of Indigenous Peoples Day actually represents the fruits of a concerted, decades-long effort to recognize the role of indigenous people in the nation’s history. In this blog you will find lessons plans , activities , action items, links to resources and videos and terminology.


Indigenous People Power

In the 1980s, Colorado’s American Indian Movement chapter began protesting the celebration of Columbus Day. In 1989, activists in South Dakota persuaded the state to replace Columbus Day with Native American Day. Both states have large Native populations that played active roles in the Red Power Movement in the 1960s and 1970s, which sought to make American Indian people more politically visible.


Then, in 1992, at the 500th anniversary of Columbus’ first voyage, American Indians in Berkeley, California, organized the first “Indigenous Peoples’ Day,” a holiday the city council soon formally adopted. Berkeley has since replaced its commemoration of Columbus with a celebration of indigenous people.


The holiday can also trace its origins to the United Nations. In 1977, indigenous leaders from around the world organized a United Nations conference in Geneva to promote indigenous sovereignty and self-determination. Their first recommendation was “to observe October 12, the day of so-called ‘discovery’ of America, as an International Day of Solidarity with the Indigenous Peoples of the Americas.” It took another 30 years for their work to be formally recognized in the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, which was adopted in September 2007.- PBS

Indigenous Peoples' Day Family Action Toolkit

Hey Grown-ups,


The kids know something fishy is going on. We teach our kids that barging in, stealing, and bullying is not okay. And yet - we also celebrate the genocide of the Taíno and Arawak people as a federal holiday. This is an act of hypocrisy.


Celebrating Columbus Day hurts Indigenous people. Our kids can’t trust us or feel safe when we tell them to be kind, but see us hurting people.

Our kids deserve better. They deserve to feel safe. They deserve the truth.

  1. Raising kids to value honesty means we must have age-appropriate conversations about colonization and its impact on Indigenous people.

  2. Raising kids to act for justice means we must empower kids with simple action tools toward reconciliation.

  3. Raising kids to be inclusive means we must listen to Indigenous people and follow their lead in decolonization.

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If you’re looking for a way to acknowledge and honor Indigenous Peoples’ Day, start with the simple steps in this toolkit to make big changes.


Support your children in being the kind and courageous people they want to be.

You are raising the next generation of kind & brilliant leaders.


In solidarity,

Ashia Ray

Student Ignition Society of Raising Luminaries

SIS_ Indigenous People_s Day Toolkit
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Download PDF • 4.02MB

Kid-Friendly Word Bank

Terms to give kids a framework of what we’re talking about. When we talk about family, this includes family of origin, adoptive, and chosen family. Find more terms & definitions in the SIS word bank.

  • Indigenous - The first people to live in an area.

  • Culture - The rules and behavior we see as normal in our family and community.

  • Values - The things people in our culture care about, what we see as right and good goals and ideas.

  • Ancestors - People in our family who lived before us and contributed to how we live today.

  • Descendants - People in our family who are born after us.

  • Heritage - The family history and cultural practices given to us by our Ancestors. Many people have more than one heritage.

  • Tribe, Nation, or Band - An official group of people who share cultural traditions, beliefs, family, and/or language. DO: refer to individual Indigenous people by their official group. DON’T: Use the word ‘tribe’ unless you’re talking about an official Indigenous group.

  • Colonization / Colonialism - Invading and controlling another country and the people who live there. Colonization hurts Indigenous people, both intentionally and unintentionally. Colonizers take Indigenous land and homes, stop them from practicing Indigenous cultural traditions, and often hurt and kill Indigenous people.

  • Oppression - Cruelty and abuse towards people with less power, caused by unfair rules made by people who abuse and take advantage of power.

  • Decolonize - To bring back independence for Indigenous people who have been harmed by colonization so all people inhabiting an area are free from oppression.

  • Hypocrisy - Saying we care about something but doing things that show we don’t actually care about it.

  • Immigrant: An immigrant is anyone who moves to one nation from another and plans to stay for a very long time.

  • Colonist - People who occupy and take power over another country, and take advantage of the land, resources, and actively or unintentionally oppress people Indigenous to the land.

  • Displanted – African people who were enslaved, forced from their ancestral lands, and not allowed to go home.

  • Settler - Immigrants and their descendants who continue the harm of colonization, but by learning and taking action, can assist Indigenous people in decolonization.

  • Land Acknowledgement - Naming and honoring the Indigenous people who have original and special relationships with the land you are on, with a promise to take steps toward their freedom and safety.

  • Reconciliation - Listening to people who we are harming and doing what they ask of us so we can all heal together.

Share the resources NativeNow has created to educate non-Natives and support #IndigenousPeoplesDay.

Native youth are leading the movement to change the narrative about Native peoples. Native Now has created resources to educate non-Natives and support Indigenous Peoples’ Day. Complete with Lesson Plans for teachers, social media graphics, a coloring book, and with a Do’s and Do Not Factsheet, Native Now is providing resources to fuel a movement. Check out the resources below for more information.

Download below for information on:

  • WHAT IS INDIGENOUS PEOPLES’ DAY AND WHO CELEBRATES IT?

  • WHY IS CELEBRATING INDIGENOUS PEOPLES’ DAY IMPORTANT?

  • INDIGENOUS PEOPLES’ DAYACROSS THE UNITED STATES CASE STUDIES AND LESSONS LEARNED

  • KEY QUESTION AND ANSWERS FOR ALLIES AND ADVOCATES

  • HOW TO RESPOND TO OPPOSITION AGAINST INDIGENOUS PEOPLES’ DAY

  • HOW TO CELEBRATE INDIGENOUS PEOPLES’ DAY IN THE TIME OF COVID

  • GENERATING AWARENESS

  • Lesson Plan and Resources to teach about

  • Resources to help people become familiar with legislation

  • So much more

Indigenous-Peoples-Day-Toolkit_B1_C4
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Download PDF • 5.94MB

Download lesson plan and check out other lessons plans here

10901_092419_Indigenous_Peoples_Day_B2_C
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Download • 1.13MB

This was shared on Facebook and not everyone is using FB links to the Meztli Project here & in images


9 Things to Do on Indigenous Peoples Day!


WHY WE DO NOT CELEGRATE COLUMBUS DAY

Columbus: In His Own Words

Reconsider what you were taught in history class about the "discovery of America" with this short animated film, History vs. Christopher Columbus.

Books I ordered for the Kids & put on our books to read list.

An Indigenous People’s History of the United States For Young People



Download your booklist here:

booklist
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Download PDF • 51KB

#OwnVoices Indigenous reading lists


Actions:

Support Indigenous-Led Organizations!

KidBingo
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Download PDF • 201KB

Action Bingo Links (for folks who printed this document)

RESOURCES

Enjoy raising empowered kids !

Tag #ChicanaUnschooler with your game of bingo above and resource you use to learn about #IndigenousPeoplesDay

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